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Dr William Frankland, the grandfather of allergy, immunologist who transformed the world's understanding of allergies, has died aged 108

Dr William Frankland, the grandfather of allergy, immunologist who transformed the world's understanding of allergies, has died aged 108.



His pioneering work included developing the thought of a count to assist pollinosis sufferers

Dr Frankland, whose medical career spanned 70 years, was referred to as "the grandfather of allergy".

As a British army doctor in war Two, he spent three-and-a-half years in Japanese prisoner of war camps.
Born in Battle, Sussex, in 1912, Dr Frankland grew up in the Lake District. He went on to review medicine at the University of Oxford and worked at St Mary's Hospital in Paddington, London, before war Two intervened.

He signed up to the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC), but spent over three of the six years he spent within the Army as a prisoner of war in Singapore.

During his 70-year long career in medicine, based at St Mary’s Hospital, he worked for Sir Fleming , who discovered penicillin.

His career in immunology began within the 1950s at St Mary's, where he worked with patients who suffered from seasonal pollinosis .

He found out a pollen trap on the roof of the hospital to spot differing types of pollen within the air and, along side his team, created a count system that led to daily pollen reports within the media.

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